Frequently asked questions about unsuccessful applications

  • The school has received more applications than places available and other applicants had a higher priority than your child under the school's published admissions criteria. As most children are considered on the basis of home to school distance, this means that other applicants live nearer to the school.

  • You can only appeal for a school that you have applied for and been denied a place. However, we expect that you will only appeal for a place at a higher preference school. You cannot appeal for a place at a school you have not applied for or the school your child has been allocated.

  • These schools are their own admission authority. It the governing body's responsibility to make decisions about which children will be offered places at the school. They also make their own arrangements for hearing appeals. You will need to contact the school to obtain an appeal form and guidance notes.

  • No. The outcome of your appeal will not be influenced by the acceptance of the place offered. However, you should accept the school offered in the event that your appeal is unsuccessful.

  • No. The school is full to its published admission number. If your appeal is successful, the school would have to admit your child by going above the admission limit.

  • Although there is no limit to the reasons you can give as to why you wish to appeal, you do need to bear in mind the school's admission arrangements. Some parents base their appeal on one or more of the reasons stated below:

    • childcare arrangements
    • travel arrangements
    • it is the nearest school
    • work commitments
    • a school's Ofsted rating
    • the child attended the school's nursery provision
    • the child has moderate learning difficulties such as delayed speech and language or dyslexia
    • family members (other than siblings) attend the school
    • the curriculum offer and school specialisms.

    However, as none of these reasons form part of Royal Greenwich's published admission arrangements, they may have little or no bearing on the decision-making process.