Greenwich

Directory: Parks, gardens and open spaces: East Greenwich Pleasaunce

Record details

TitleEast Greenwich Pleasaunce
SummaryEast Greenwich Pleasaunce is one of Greenwich's Green Flag Award-winning sites.

A formal, tree-lined garden, it is a quiet haven that contains a burial ground for around 3,000 sailors who spent their last days at the local Royal Hospital Greenwich.

The Bridge is a voluntary run children's play centre based in the park.

There is a children's playground, table tennis and a cafe serving refreshments and providing toilet facilities.
AddressChevening Road,
Greenwich SE10
AreaGreenwich
Map reference
HighlightsThe trees on display include: Mock orange, hawthorn, silver birch, ash, variegated holly, walnut, poplar, weeping birch
AwardsEast Greenwich Pleasaunce has retained the Green Flag award for the 2016 to 2017 period after first winning it in 2008 to 2009.

Learn more about Green Flag parks in Royal Borough of Greenwich on http://www.royalgreenwich.gov.uk/greenflag
Sports and play areasChildren's playground
Emailparks@royalgreenwich.gov.uk
Telephone020 8856 0100
Access informationWheelchair access is available.
Public transport linkshttp://www.royalgreenwich.gov.uk/info/200078/public_transport/1916/getting_around_using_public_transport
Further informationThe naval cemetery within the Pleasaunce is a window to the maritime past. With the Royal Hospital Greenwich graveyard judged to be full in the 1840s, the Royal Navy needed a new burial site. A long search for land followed, until, in 1857, the admiralty bought an orchard in east Greenwich for use as the new cemetery.

In 1875, the remains of 3,000 naval pensioners were moved from central Greenwich to this new cemetery. This was to make way for the construction of a railway tunnel. In 1926, the Metropolitan Borough of Greenwich (a predecessor of the Royal Borough of Greenwich) acquired the site. The name 'Pleasaunce' came into use shortly after, when the site opened as a public park.

Visitors to the East Greenwich Pleasaunce can see a plaque on the wall describing how the remains were moved.
Friends of Park websitehttps://fegp.org/

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